Tips and Tricks for Online Courses: A Q&A with Instructional Designers

In the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, we have a group called the Office of e-Learning Services (ELS) that works closely with instructors who teach fully online. The model we use here is working collaboratively and often with instructional designers in ELS to design our online courses. We (the instructors) are the content experts and they are the technology and learning management system (LMS) experts. They provide instructional support (e.g., activities, assessments), lecture development (e.g., production), and LMS course site development (to name a few; for more info, see this page). I value their insights in online learning and invited them to share their insights on StatTLC. In this post, you will meet two of the members from ELS: Katy Korchik and Kris Woll.

This post is in a question and answer format. Enjoy!

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Making Awesome Tables and Figures Using Gestalt Principles

Contributing author Silas Bergen is an associate professor of statistics and data science at Winona State University.

It was late October in Minnesota, a perfect time for a swim in a local lake! At least, so thought a biology professor at our university (I’ll call him Dr. Doe). This chilly excursion dislodged an idea in his mind: what is the relationship between the body temperature recovery at different areas of the body and water temperature? Dr. Doe collected data from six hard-core swimmers and asked me if my students in the statistical consulting class could help him answer his question “Sure”, I said.

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